Climate quiz. How climate literate are you?  

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(@jeanne-mayell)
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11/27/2019 11:24 pm  

Saw this and now I’m curious how our readers stand. https://www.washingtonpost.com/climate-solutions/2019/11/22/quiz-how-much-do-you-know-about-climate-change/?arc404=true

I got one wrong —the amount of expected warming by 2100.  I thought it would be worse than they are predicting.  
Anyone  care to try it? 

 


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 Dina
(@dina)
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11/28/2019 5:10 am  

@jeanne-mayell

Same as you, got one wrong x


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(@lenor)
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11/28/2019 8:39 am  

@jeanne-mayell

I got the same one wrong as you.  


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(@laura-f)
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11/28/2019 5:49 pm  

Paywall, can't access it...

 


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(@jeanne-mayell)
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11/28/2019 10:22 pm  

@Laura F, here's the quiz. You probably can't click for the answers, but you can look them up.

1. What has the scientific community concluded about climate change?

2. Which of these factors most contributes to current global warming?

3. What is the greenhouse effect?

4. True or false: Climate change is heating the world evenly.

5. What famous goal did 195 countries affirm in Paris in 2015?

6. Which country announced in 2017 that it would withdraw from that Paris climate agreement?

7. In a “high-emissions scenario,” how much do scientists predict the Earth will heat up by the end of the century, compared with the average temperature between 1986 and 2005?

8. True or false: Climate change and extreme weather are linked.

9. Combined, how much mass are ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica losing annually?

10. Extreme heat in Siberia has caused permafrost to melt. The remains of which ancient creature are now emerging from the frozen ground?


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(@jeanne-mayell)
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11/28/2019 10:27 pm  

Let's set up our own climate quiz but asking questions and then we can put them together. 

I have a few people might want to get tested on. 

1. Name 3 or more climate hot spots in the globe, including one in the U.S., where climate change is happening faster than the rest of the climate.

2. What is the significance of the Gulf Stream and climate change?  (Hint: this was the main premise behind the movie The Day After Tomorrow. 

 


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(@triciact)
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12/02/2019 10:22 am  

@jeanne-mayell

I took the quiz from your previous post and got two wrong (#5 I said A but it was D, and #9 I said B but it was C).

On your question/quiz my answers are:

1. The Arctic, NY/NJ and Europe (Spain, Germany, Austria, Switzerland etc). I have family in Germany and growing up I remember summers were very cool, now their Sept was in the 90s when I was there and we had no air conditioning!

2. Hotter temps in Europe/UK and more natural disasters would be my answer.


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(@coyote)
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12/02/2019 8:46 pm  

@jeanne-mayell

For your quiz, these are my answers,

1) The entire Arctic region, the northern Great Plains of the US (Minnesota and the Dakotas), and the Indian subcontinent.

2) Melting of the Greenland ice sheet will slow down the Gulf Stream, which in turn will result in much colder winter temperatures for Europe and the British Isles (and also less precipitation). 


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(@jeanne-mayell)
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12/02/2019 9:40 pm  

Coyote, correct. As you mentioned in a previous post, the US Eastern Seaboard from Cape Hatteras to Maine is also a hotspot where we are seeing double the global sea level rise.   


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(@bluebelle)
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12/02/2019 11:49 pm  

@jeanne-mayell

Interesting quiz.  I missed one and it turned out to be the same one you missed.


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(@jeanne-mayell)
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12/03/2019 12:03 am  

@triciact and @coyote,

National Geographic just released this article about the slowing down of the Gulf Stream, known as the Atlantic Meridian  Ocean Circulation (AMOC). Ten years ago when I first read about the slow-down of the Gulf Stream I felt intuitively that it would eventually trigger catastrophic and irreversible climate change. That is what scientists fear is coming now. The AMOC is the heart beat of the earth.  It is like the heart is slowing down. 

The immediate effects I was thinking about when I asked the question were: (1) increase in sea level rise on the eastern seaboard because the Gulf Stream will no longer pull water into it and that water will wash back onto the U.S. east coast, and (2) Europe could suffer initially very cold weather, even possibly some summer less years, which would be devastating to farming there but the rest of the world would make up the shortfall for them.

Remember that Europe is kept warm by the Gulf Stream which brings warmer water north from Africa and the Caribbean.  As the Gulf Stream slows down, it stops bringing warm air north.  The Gulf Stream is slowing down  because of a large amount of fresh water in the North Atlantic coming from Greenland ice melt.  Fresh water is lighter than salt water, and doesn't sink. It is the sinking of the Gulf Stream waters in the North Atlantic that causes the conveyer belt effect of the Gulf Stream, pulling the warm water to the deep ocean when it cools in the North Atlantic. 

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/2019/12/why-ocean-current-critical-to-world-weather-losing-steam-arctic/

But the slowing down of AMOC will have even more effects for the whole globe since it is essentially the heart pump of our earth and is the source of the ocean circulation.  

It's hard to imagine what the oceans will be like when they stop circulating.  But scientists feel it will affect the monsoons.


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(@echec_et_maths)
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12/03/2019 6:27 am  

I got 8 on the original quiz in the first post.

For climate hotspots, I think of alaska and greenland. not sure about others. I'm also unsure how the gulf stream will be affected by climate change, but I know that in normal times (the past), the Gulf Stream is what gave western Europe its mild climate (and possibly helped it thrive agriculturally, then as a civilization).

Here's another quiz that I saw a few months back, about tackling climate change

https://edition.cnn.com/interactive/2019/04/specials/climate-change-solutions-quiz/

This one's harder because you have to put the items in order by impact.

The one practical way I keep pondering about is planting trees. They think planting a trillion trees can reverse the current trend. I'm wondering how someone like myself with no knowledge of horticulture, no land, and limited money should proceed. I'm looking at sites that promise to plant a tree for every dollar donated (nationalforest.org or onetreeplanted.org), but I don't know if they're legit.

McMoneagle saw a greening movement that starts in 2015. At some point, the chinese people would initiate a massive tree planting event by planting 125 billion small sapling trees in one week ("trees of life" he called them) (Ultimate Time Machine, bottom of p 194, top of p 195), with the world following suit.  This hasn't seem to have happened yet. The closest I could see in the news was when Ethiopia planted 350 million trees in 12 hours a few months ago:

https://www.cnn.com/2019/07/29/africa/ethiopia-plants-350-million-trees-intl-hnk/index.html

and they named it "green legacy".


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(@coyote)
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12/03/2019 12:59 pm  

@jeanne-mayell

I'm wondering, Jeanne, if you know anything about how the slowing Gulf Stream will affect temperatures  in the Northeastern US and Eastern Canada. Everything I've read on the subject is about Europe.


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(@jeanne-mayell)
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12/03/2019 3:25 pm  

@coyote Funny you should ask. I've been exploring this question this afternoon. When I saw the attached map, I realized why no-one is saying that the Gulf Stream warms New England.  It veers away from New England much further south - around Cape Hatteras, NC. The map shows the temperatures of the Atlantic coast which shows New England's water not appreciably warmed by the Gulf Stream. 

Here's a March 2018 article that talks only of the Gulf Stream's impact on sea levels,

As you have said, the main impact on New England, and it is a big one, is that it has been pulling water away from the East Coast, and when it slows down, that water will flow back, raising sea levels here.  

New England has been experiencing much colder winters from climate change from other factors -- primarily the dissembling of the Polar Vortex, the jet stream winds around the Arctic that used to keep Arctic cold air inside the Arctic. The Polar Vortex is like a rubber band of wind around the Arctic that is now loose and sometimes stretches down to New England.  When that happens, we get the polar air, deep snows. I think you already know all this, but maybe others don't, so am including it.

1575404937-Gulf-Streem-3-PM.jpg

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(@jeanne-mayell)
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12/03/2019 5:22 pm  

@echec_et_maths. Your climate quiz is excellent for helping people to know what they can do to contribute to the solving the problem. https://edition.cnn.com/interactive/2019/04/specials/climate-change-solutions-quiz/

 

 


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(@echec_et_maths)
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12/03/2019 11:26 pm  
Posted by: @coyote

@jeanne-mayell

I'm wondering, Jeanne, if you know anything about how the slowing Gulf Stream will affect temperatures  in the Northeastern US and Eastern Canada. Everything I've read on the subject is about Europe.

The only thing I can think of is it crosses path with the Atlantic hurricane formation "corridor" (from West Africa towards the Caribbean). I don't think it crosses as much with northeaster paths. I read a couple of months back hurricanes are supposed to move more slowly in the future (all the while dumping water - a-la-harvey), but I don't know if it's related to this

https://www.cnn.com/2019/09/05/weather/hurricanes-speed-slowing-trnd/index.html

 


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(@echec_et_maths)
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12/03/2019 11:28 pm  

@jeanne-mayell

eh, wrong link. that's the ethiopian tree planting one. This is the climate change solutions one

https://edition.cnn.com/interactive/2019/04/specials/climate-change-solutions-quiz/

 


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(@unk-p)
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12/04/2019 1:04 am  

@echec_et_maths

I read a couple of months back hurricanes are supposed to move more slowly in the future (all the while dumping water - a-la-harvey),

-which would be a very bad thing.  Our house, which has been here since the 1930's, had never flooded.  Not even close, having been thru plenty of hurricanes.

But then came Hurricane Harvey, and i find myself floating my elderly parents on an inflatable mattress, up the street, water up to my neck.  Bugs clinging to my head and hands, and i don't even mind, as we all want to live.  The stray cats we feed, looking down from rooftops, distraught.

It always seems so abstract, until it's not


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(@triciact)
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12/04/2019 9:35 am  

@unk-p

I'm so sorry you endured that! So glad you are all ok. 


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